Volume 6, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 17-28
Occupational Stress and Associated Factors among Nurses working in Public Hospitals of Arsi Zone, Oromia Regional State, Central Ethiopia, 2018
Biniam Worku Hailu, Department of Health Economics, Management and Policy, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Yohannes Ejigu, Department of Health Economics, Management and Policy, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Yibeltal Siraneh, Department of Health Economics, Management and Policy, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Received: Sep. 16, 2019;       Accepted: Oct. 22, 2019;       Published: Apr. 30, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijbecs.20200602.11      View  189      Downloads  151
Abstract
Nursing, by its nature, is an occupation subject to a high degree of stress. This profession involves working with people who are themselves suffering a considerable degree of stress. Occupational stress compromised quality of service delivery and also leads as employees’ burnout, turnover and absenteeism. The Objective of the study is to determine the level of occupational stress and associated factors among nurses. The study employed facility based cross sectional study was conducted from August 13 –September 02, 2018. All nurses who served at least for 6 months in Arsi zone public hospitals were asked using self-administered structured questionnaire. The collected data was checked manually, edited, coded and entered into Epi-data version 3.1 and finally it was exported in to statistical package for social science version 24 for cleaning and analysis. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate frequency percent and mean. Dependent variables (occupational stress) were computed based on the respondents having average score of mean and above in expanded nursing stress scale. Then, associations between independent and dependent variables were analyzed first using bivariate binary logistic regression. Variables that had p<0.25 on bivariate binary logistic regression were entered into multivariable binary logistic regression and adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% CI were reported. The study finding showed that 202 (53%) with (95% CI: 48.2-58.1) of nurses were occupationally stressful. Factors significantly associated with occupational stress among nurses were sex of respondents (female: AOR=2.37, 95% CI: 1.41, 3.97), marital status (ever married: AOR=2.49, 95% CI: 1.35, 4.60), Role ambiguity (nurses who had Role ambiguity: AOR=3.01, 95% CI: 1.79, 5.05) and working hours. (≥8hrs hours per day: AOR=2.85, 95% CI: 1.10, 7.36). In this study, more than half of nurses had occupational stress, Thus, Arsi zone public hospitals collaborative with concerned stakeholders to design stress reduction program for tackling occupational stress among nurses.
Keywords
Occupational Stress, Nurses, Associated Factors
To cite this article
Biniam Worku Hailu, Yohannes Ejigu, Yibeltal Siraneh, Occupational Stress and Associated Factors among Nurses working in Public Hospitals of Arsi Zone, Oromia Regional State, Central Ethiopia, 2018, International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Clinical Science. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2020, pp. 17-28. doi: 10.11648/j.ijbecs.20200602.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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