Volume 3, Issue 3, May 2017, Page: 22-24
Shigellosis in a Newborn---An Uncommon Case
Jamal Khan, Department of Pediatrics, Glocal Hospital, Krishnanagore, India
Sujit Kumar Bhattacharya, Department of General Medicine, Glocal Hospital, Krishnanagore, India
Received: Apr. 11, 2017;       Accepted: May 24, 2017;       Published: Oct. 18, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijbecs.20170303.12      View  1506      Downloads  47
Abstract
A new born baby was admitted to the Glocal hospital, Krishnanagore, and presented with loose stools mixed with blood and mucous and abdominal distension for last five days. The baby was crying all through the day; presumably, he had severe tenesmus (a feeling of incomplete sense of defecation with rectal pain). He was diagnosed, clinically, to be suffering from shigellosis, which was confirmed by isolation of Shigella spp; by stool culture. The baby recovered with antibiotic treatment. It is an uncommon case of shigellosis in new born babies. Hand washing practices are recommended to prevent transmission of shigellosis and other diseases as well. Shigellae vaccines are attractive disease prevention strategy. Shigellosis caused by S. flexneri type 2 and S. dysenteria type 1 are the two most common and important serotype candidates against which vaccine development are currently being directed.
Keywords
Shigellosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, Gut Involvement, Culture, New Born
To cite this article
Jamal Khan, Sujit Kumar Bhattacharya, Shigellosis in a Newborn---An Uncommon Case, International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Clinical Science. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2017, pp. 22-24. doi: 10.11648/j.ijbecs.20170303.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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