Volume 3, Issue 2, March 2017, Page: 6-13
In Vitro Antiprotozoal Activities and Cytotoxicity of Selected Sudanese Medicinal Plants
Ahmed S. Kabbashi, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan; Medicinal and Aromatic Plants and Traditional Medicine Research Institute (MAPTMRI), National Center for Research, Khartoum, Sudan
El-badri E. Osman, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Mohamed I. Garbi, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Ibrahim F. Ahmed, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Mahmmoud S. Saleh, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Ali M. Badri, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Ahmed A. Elshikh, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Nadir Abuzeid, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory, Omdurman Islamic University, Omdurman, Sudan
Waleed S. Koko, College of Science and Arts in Ar Rass, University of Qassim, Buraydah, KSA
Mahmoud M. Dahab, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Received: May 12, 2017;       Accepted: May 24, 2017;       Published: Aug. 23, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijbecs.20170302.11      View  1420      Downloads  54
Abstract
Entamoeba histolytica is ranked third on the list of parasitic protozoan infections leading to death behind malaria and schistosomiasis. It is estimated also up to 200 millions of people are chronically infected with Giardia lamblia globally. Metronidazole is the drug currently widely used and recommended in the treatment of amoebiasis and giardiasis. However; sometimes it causes adverse effects such as myoplasia, neuralgia, allergic dermatitis, and others. The in vitro antiprotozoal activities of some selected Sudanese medicinal plants (Acacia nilotica subsp. nilotica, Adansonia digitata, Cyperus rotundus and Nigella sativa) were determined against Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia by employing the sub-culture method. The mammalian cytotoxicity of the investigated plants against normal Vero cell line was determined by applying MTT [(4, 5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] method. All plants examined 100% inhibition at a concentration 500 μg/ml after 96 h; this was compared with Metronidazole which gave 95% inhibition at concentration 312.5 μg/ml at the same time against Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia. In addition, cytotoxicity (MTT-assay) of these plants against normal Vero cell line which verified the safety of the examined extracts with an IC50 less 100 μg/ml. These studies prove the potent activity of extracts against E. histolyica and G. lamblia trophozoites in vitro with verified safety evidence for use.
Keywords
Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, Medicinal Plants, Metronidazole, Cytotoxicity
To cite this article
Ahmed S. Kabbashi, El-badri E. Osman, Mohamed I. Garbi, Ibrahim F. Ahmed, Mahmmoud S. Saleh, Ali M. Badri, Ahmed A. Elshikh, Nadir Abuzeid, Waleed S. Koko, Mahmoud M. Dahab, In Vitro Antiprotozoal Activities and Cytotoxicity of Selected Sudanese Medicinal Plants, International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Clinical Science. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2017, pp. 6-13. doi: 10.11648/j.ijbecs.20170302.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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